HES (UK) Committee

The History of Education Society (UK) Executive Committee comprises fifthteen members and meets four times a year. Currently, the committee includes the following members (in alphabetical order):

Sue Anderson-Faithful, is a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Education Heath and Social Care at the University of Winchester. Her research interests are in the field of the history of women, philanthropy, religion and education in the nineteenth and early twentieth century, with a focus on the early Mothers’ Union and Girls’ Friendly Society. Sue is member of the Women’s History Network and a fellow of the Higher Education Academy. She is also an active member of the University of Winchester’s Centre for the History of Women’s Education which takes a broad brief on promoting research into the gendered policy and provision of education, formal, informal and popular relating to women and girls. The Centre hosts conferences, seminars and community outreach events. Sue is the centre’s representative on the steering committee of the Sybil Campbell Collection and editor the Sybil Campbell Collection Newsletter. Sue has delivered papers at conference organised by the Women’s History Network, The History of Education Society and the International Standing Conference on the History of Education. Her work has appeared in the journal of the Brazil History of education Society’s Revista Brasileira de História da Educação and in the History of Education Society’s History of Education Researcher. Email: Sue.faithful@wincheser.ac.uk

Catherine Burke (President) is currently Reader in History of Childhood and Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research interests include, material cultures of childhood and education; the historical and contemporary relationship between pedagogy and architecture and design in learning environments; and visual methods in incorporating a child's view or perspective in research. She has co-authored two books with Ian Grosvenor - The School I'd Like (Routledge 2003) and School (Reaktion 2008). Her most recent book is A Life in Education and Architecture. Mary Beaumont Medd 1907-2005 published in 2013 by Ashgate.She has edited a special issue of Paedagogica Historica, 'Containing the School Child. Architectures and Pedagogies', August, 2005, and in 2007 a special issue of History of Education on the theme of 'The Body of the Schoolchild in the History of Education'. The Annual Conference of the Society was organised by Catherine in December 2009 and was held in Sheffield with the theme 'Putting Education in its Place'. She is also the 'Sources and Interpretations' editor for the History of Education journal.

Jonathan Doney (Treasurer and Co-editor History of Education Researcher) is a Research Fellow and Associate Lecturer at the University of Exeter's Graduate School of Education and an Associate Lecturer at the University of Winchester. In his doctoral work he deploys Foucault's historical methods to explore how an investigation of the supra-national Christian Ecumenical movement enriches understandings of how the adoption of World Religions Teaching became possible in England during the 1960s and 1970s. Jonathan's first degree is in Theological Studies (Bristol) and he holds a Masters in Educational Research (Exeter). In addition, he has a diverse research background covering agriculture, theology and education. Jonathan has previously taught Religious Education in primary and secondary schools, and more recently has worked on a number of research projects relating to the history of Religious Education, the history of elite girls' education and the development of Religious Education in current classroom practice. His wider research interests centre on methodological innovation, post-structural approaches to educational histories, critical studies, and the role of education in developing identity.

Heather Ellis (Co-opted) is currently Vice-Chancellor's Fellow in the School of Education, University of Sheffield. Before this she held teaching positions at Liverpool Hope University and the Humboldt University, Berlin. She is the author of Generational Conflict and University Reform: Oxford in the Age of Revolution (Brill 2012) which was jointly awarded the 2014 Kevin Brehony prize. Heather is currently finishing a book project for Palgrave Macmillan exploring the connections between masculinity and scientific authority in nineteenth and early twentieth-century Britain. Other research interests include the history of generational identity, the history of universities, and the reception of classical scholarship. She is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and her contact details are as follows: Dr. Heather Ellis, The School of Education, University of Sheffield, 388 Glossop Road, Sheffield, S10 2JA; Tel: 0114 222 8086 291 3759; Email: h.l.ellis@sheffield.ac.uk. Website: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/education/staff/academic/ellish

John Field (co-opted) is Emeritus Professor in the University of Stirling, Visiting Professor at the University of Warwick, and Gastprofessor at the Universität zu Köln. His research focuses on the history of adult education and training; he has written about the influence of behaviourism on education and training, inter-organisational conflicts and settlements in wartime adult education, adult education and active citizenship, the educational ideas and practices of utopian movements, and the relationship between skills, work, and masculinities. Recent publications include Working Men’s Bodies: Work Camps in Britain 1880-1940 (Manchester University Press, 2013). He is currently studying the International Voluntary Service for Peace in Britain and Germany after WW2. Email: john.field@stir.ac.uk

Rob Freathy (Website Manager/Publicity and Co-editor of History of Education Researcher) is Associate Professor of History of Education in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Exeter. He is Associate Dean (Education) in the College of Social Sciences and International Studies. He has published articles in History of Education, History of Education Researcher, Oxford Review of Education, Religious Education (USA), British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values and Journal for the Study of Spirituality, as well as contributing chapters to a number of books, including Religious Education and Freedom of Religion and Belief (Oxford, 2012) and History, Remembrance and Religious Education (Oxford, 2015) both of which he co-edited with Stephen Parker and Leslie J. Francis. With Stephan and Leslie, Rob co-edits a series of books published by Peter Lang on the theme of Religion, Education and Values. He is Book Reviews Editor for History of Education, co-editor, with Jonathan Doney, of History of Education Researcher, and an editorial board member for the British Journal of Religious Education. He is also responsible for developing Exe Libris: The UK History of Education Society On-line Bibliography (in association with the University of Exeter). His contact details are: Dr. R. J. K. Freathy, Graduate School of Education, University of Exeter, Heavitree Road, Exeter, EX1 2LU. Telephone: 01392 724818. Email: r.j.k.freathy@ex.ac.uk.

Lottie Hoare (Joint postgraduate representative) is a teacher and writer. Published work on education includes articles on Dame Margaret Miles (FORUM: 54/1, 2012); Hilary Pepler (History of Education Researcher 91/May 2013) and an ODNB entry on Dorothy Elmhirst. From October 2013 she will be working on an AHRC funded PhD at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge, supervised by Dr Catherine Burke. She has research interests in the history of comprehensive schooling; educational interactions as recorded on radio and in documentary film and the use of multiple intelligences in educational research. Her PhD study will examine the representation of education in the broadcast media 1954-1965.

Ken Jones. Email: K.Jones@nut.org.uk

Jane Martin (Past President) is Professor of Social History of Education and Head of Department of Education and Social Justice at the University of Birmingham. She was previously Head of Department of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Institute of Education, University of London and has lectured in Education Studies, History, Sociology and Women’s Studies at the University of Northampton and London Metropolitan University. Her publications include Women and the Politics of Schooling in Victorian and Edwardian England, winner of the History of Education Society (UK) Book Prize 2002 and Making Socialists: Mary Bridges Adams and the Fight for Knowledge and Power 1855-1939 (2010). Her books with Joyce Goodman include Women and Education 1800-1980 (2004) and a 4-volume set for Routledge Women and Education: Major Themes in Education (2011). She is a past editor of the journal History of Education and was the Brian Simon BERA Educational Research Fellow for 2004/5. Currently, she is writing a biography of Caroline Benn.

Raymond McCluskey is Lecturer in Social Studies (History) in the School of Education at the University of Glasgow. A graduate of Glasgow (MA) and Oxford (DPhil), he began his career as a medievalist, focusing on the cultural contexts of the so-called Twelfth-Century Renaissance. In more recent years, his research interests have focused on the history of education and the history of the Catholic community in Scotland. He has published a wide range of books and articles, amongst the most recent of which include: R. McCluskey and S. J. McKinney, eds., How the Teacher is represented in Literature, History, Religion and the Arts: Cross Cultural Analysis of a Stereotype (Edwin Mellen Press, 2013). As well as membership of the Executive of the History of Education (UK) Society, he is a long-standing member of Council of the Scottish Catholic Historical Association, publishers of the biannual journal, The Innes Review. Email: raymond.mccluskey@glasgow.ac.uk.

Stephen Parker (Secretary) is Professor of the History of Religion and Education at the University of Worcester. His PhD, published as Faith on the Home Front (Oxford, 2005), focused upon popular religion during the Second World War and the role of the churches during the blitz. Stephen has recently authored and co-edited a further volume stemming from the themes of his thesis: God and War: the Church of England and armed conflict in the twentieth century (Ashgate, 2012). He has published widely (with Dr Rob Freathy) on the history of religious education in the twentieth-century. Stephen is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and of the Royal Society for Arts, a Member of the International Seminar on Religious Education and Values, and Associate Editor and Reviews Editor of the Journal of Beliefs and Values. Recently Stephen successfully bid to the Leverhulme Trust for a Research Project Grant to investigate a project entitled ‘Faith on the Air: a religious educational broadcasting history, c. 1922-present’ (funded 2014-2017). Stephen’s contact details are: Professor S.G. Parker, Institute of Education, Henwick Road, Worcester, WR2 6AJ. Telephone: 01905 542165. Email: s.parker@worc.ac.uk Website: http://www.worcester.ac.uk/discover/dr-stephen-parker.html

Deirdre Raftery (joint editor of History of Education, Jan 2009-Dec 2013) has a PhD from Trinity College Dublin, where she lectured for five years before being appointed to the School of Education at University College Dublin, where she is Director of Research and supervisor of Masters and PhD research in the history of education. She has published extensively in her field, presenting papers and carrying out research in the USA, South Africa, South East Asia, and in many parts of Europe. She has been a Visiting Fellow at the University of Oxford, and is an honorary Life Member of Girton College Cambridge. She won the CHSHWA Hibernian Research Award, University of Notre Dame (2012), and was an Ireland-Canada University Foundation scholar in 2012. Publications: Women & Learning in English Writing, 1600-1900 (1997), and (jointly) Emily Davies: Selected Letters, 1861-1875 (2004); Female Education in Ireland, 1700-1900: Minerva or Madonna (2006); Choosing a School: Second Level Education in Ireland (2007). For Routledge, she has published (jointly) Gender and Education: International Perspectives (2010), and History of Education: Themes and Perspectives (2013). She has also published many articles and chapters, including contributions to Paedagogica Historica; History of Education; The Routledge Companion to Education; Educating the Child in Enlightenment Britain, and to the forthcoming Routledge volume, Education and the State (2014). Her new book, jointly with Karin Fischer, is Education and Irish Society: Historical Perspectives (2014). She is currently researching a history of Irish women religious (nuns) and international education, 1840-1940.

Stephanie Spencer is currently Head of Department - Education Studies at The University of Winchester with special interest in history and gender. She completed her PhD ‘Girls and Career Choice in the late 1950s: constructions of the female role' in 2001, now published as Gender, Work and Education in Britain in the 1950s by Palgrave. An article based on research for the thesis, ‘Schoolgirl to Career Girl: the city as educative space', won the ISCHE prize for best paper by new scholar at the Birmingham conference in 2001. Publications include articles in History of Education, Women's History Review, Paedagogica Historica and Journal of Educational Administration and History. She is on the editorial board of Women's History Review and Journal of Educational Administration and History.  Her current research interests include co convening an ESRC seminar series on Women in Britain in the 1950s with Penny Tinkler (Manchester) and Claire Langhamer (Sussex), the Alumni Voices oral history project at the University of Winchester and  transnational femininities in girls' school and college stories with Nancy Rosoff (Rutgers). She convenes the Centre for the History of Women's Education, based at The University of Winchester.

Ex Officio Members

Mark Freeman (Co-editor History of Education) is Reader in Education and Social History in the Department of Education, Practice and Society, UCL Institute of Education, University College London. He worked for many years at the University of Glasgow, and has also held research posts at the Universities of York and Hull, and the Institute of Historical Research. His research interests include the history of British adult education and youth organisations, and he has published on these themes in History of Education, English Historical Review, Quaker Studies and many other journals. He was the convenor of the HES annual conference in 2011. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, and is currently a co-investigator on a large AHRC-funded project entitled ‘The Redress of the Past: Historical Pageants in Britain 1905-2016’ (see http://www.historicalpageants.ac.uk/). His contact details are Dr Mark Freeman, Department of Education, Practice and Society, UCL Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London. WC1H 0AL. Email: M.Freeman@ioe.ac.uk. Website: http://www.markfreeman.org.uk/

Tom Woodin (Co-editor History of Education) is a Reader in the Social History of Education at the UCL Institute of Education where he is the programme leader for the History of Education MA. He has written on worker writers and community publishing in the UK since the 1970s and is currently producing on a book on the topic to be published by Manchester University Press in 2017. He researches co-operation and education and recently edited Co-operation, Learning and Co-operative Values (Routledge 2014). He led an ESRC funded project on the history of the school leaving age which resulted in a book, with Gary McCulloch and Steve Cowan, Secondary Education and the Raising of the School Leaving Age - Coming of Age? (Palgrave Macmillan 2013). Working with David Crook and Vincent Carpentier, he led another project for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation on the history of community and mutual ownership which resulted in a report on the topic: http://www.jrf.org.uk/publications/community-mutual-ownership. In 2007-8 he was the British Educational Research Association Brian Simon Fellow. His other research interests include the social history of learning, the history of social and labour movements, and the life and work of Brian Simon. He co-edits History of Education with Susannah Wright and Mark Freeman and, from 2008-13, co-edited the History of Education Researcher.

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Girls’ Day School Trust. Staff prior to 1891.

London Day Training College

School children drinking milk

Royal Albert Memorial College, Exeter, 1906.

Student studying next to racks of student work and books.

Girls’ Day School Trust. Staff prior to 1891.

London Day Training College

School children drinking milk

Royal Albert Memorial College, Exeter, 1906.

Student studying next to racks of student work and books.

Girls’ Day School Trust. Staff prior to 1891.

London Day Training College

School children drinking milk

Royal Albert Memorial College, Exeter, 1906.

Student studying next to racks of student work and books.

Girls’ Day School Trust. Staff prior to 1891.

London Day Training College

School children drinking milk

Royal Albert Memorial College, Exeter, 1906.

 

Student studying next to racks of student work and books.

Girls’ Day School Trust. Staff prior to 1891.

London Day Training College

School children drinking milk

Royal Albert Memorial College, Exeter, 1906.

 

Student studying next to racks of student work and books.

Girls’ Day School Trust. Staff prior to 1891.